1869 - Fanny Jackson Coppin, First African-American Female Principle

Title

1869 - Fanny Jackson Coppin, First African-American Female Principle

Description

Portrait image of Fanny Jackson Coppin
"Fanny Jackson Coppin (October 15, 1837 – January 21, 1913) was an African American educator...She served as the principal of the Ladies Department and taught Greek, Latin, and Mathematics…[she was] the first African American woman to become a school principal. In her 37 years at the Institute, Fanny Jackson was responsible for vast educational improvements in Philadelphia. She was the first African American superintendent of a school district in the United States."

Creator

Institute for Colored Youth

Date

1869

Source

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WQdbF2-tjFA/VnMYGyeWYYI/AAAAAAAABJ0/UReKo2-EVC8/s1600/addy2.jpg

Relation

Rights

Portrait image of Fanny Jackson Coppin

Source: Fanny Jackson Coppin, born a slave, graduated from Oberlin College and became the first African-American woman to become a school principal. Retrieved on http://alturl.com/uuz5i

Publisher

Institute for Colored Youth

Contributor

Institute for Colored Youth

Format

Medium: Photograph

Language

English

Type

Figures

Identifier

Fancy Jackson Coppin, African-Americans, School Principal, Education, Women

Coverage

Historic

Files

addy2.jpg

Reference

Institute for Colored Youth, 1869 - Fanny Jackson Coppin, First African-American Female Principle, Institute for Colored Youth, 1869

Cite As

Institute for Colored Youth, “1869 - Fanny Jackson Coppin, First African-American Female Principle,” Virtual Museum of Public Service, accessed September 24, 2022, https://vmps.omeka.net/items/show/267.