Justice Jane Bolin, First African-American Judge

Title

Justice Jane Bolin, First African-American Judge

Description

In college, Jane Bolin was surrounded by white male students who would ignore her, and her career advisor told her to stop pursing her judicial dreams. She promptly ignored all the obstacles in her way, and became the first African-American woman to graduate from Yale Law School, the first to join the New York City Bar Association, and the first to join the New York City Law Department. She was officially appointed as a judge the New York World’s Fair on July 22, 1939 and would serve on the bench until she was forced to retire at age 70. As a member of the NAACP, she strived to create racial equality in all of her causes. She encouraged such equality in child services, ensured that probation officers were hired without regard to religion or race, and funded childcare agencies that would help children regardless of race.

Creator

Library of Congress

Date

1942

Source

https://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/fsa/8e04000/8e04200/8e04218r.jpg

Relation

Rights

A black and white photograph of Jane Matilda Bolin, the first African-American woman to serve as a judge.

Source: Jane Bolin. (2012, July 24). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 15:31, October 5, 2012, from http://bit.ly/SOVH3Z

Publisher

Library of Congress

Contributor

Library of Congress

Format

Medium: Photograph.

Language

English

Type

Figures

Identifier

Criminal Justice

Coverage

Historic

Files

https://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/fsa/8e04000/8e04200/8e04218r.jpg

Reference

Library of Congress, Justice Jane Bolin, First African-American Judge, Library of Congress, 1942

Cite As

Library of Congress, “Justice Jane Bolin, First African-American Judge,” Virtual Museum of Public Service, accessed June 25, 2022, https://vmps.omeka.net/items/show/201.