Philanthropy (G-3)

Title

Philanthropy (G-3)

Description

“We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give.” 
 
-Winston Churchill
 
Philanthropy is an age-old concept, which comes in many forms to provide support in dealing with the root causes of major global challenges; resource scarcities in small communities; and individual needs among the disabled and disadvantaged. Philanthropy provides a broad perspective for thinking about the meaning of one’s life in reference to personal sacrifice, and good will. The desire to “give back” may be the province of the most fortunate among us, but the desire to give is much more universal. Donors, whether large or small, also recognize the importance of giving more than money. Many are able to give non-financial assets, such as their influence to advance advocacy programs, contacts and networks to expand the reach of fundraising initiatives; and their professional expertise. The field of philanthropy also plays an important role in supporting experimental stages of innovative ideas, which when proven can be utilized and implemented by governments toward addressing public problems. Philanthropists are often at the helm of initiatives involving partnerships between public and private organizations as well as civil society.
 
Philanthropists have traditionally been the major contributors to the establishment of important public institutions, such as free libraries, hospitals, medical colleges, science laboratories, sports and entertainment centers, and universities.  These are recognized as social investments with returns that can reduce human suffering and improve the general well-being of individuals and societies through solving social problems, enriching cultures, and strengthening societies. Philanthropy is fundamental to culture of the United States. The number of benevolent organizations continues to rise. Private businesses are also becoming more caring and socially responsible with organizational policies that promote better working environments and practices that benefit society beyond what they are legally required to do.
 
The Philanthropy gallery presents examples of noteworthy philanthropists from the mid 19th century on, who have made important contributions to humanity.

Collection Items

US AID - From the American People
"There is no escaping our obligations: our moral obligations as a wise leader and good neighbor in the interdependent community of free nations – our economic obligations as the wealthiest people in a world of largely poor people, as a nation no…

Milestones in Philanthropy - Alexis de Tocqueville
"I am not so much alarmed at the excessive liberty which reigns... as at the inadequate securities which one finds there against tyranny."Alexis de Tocqueville was a 19thcentury French Aristocrat what democracy was a highly exotic and new political…

Community Engagement through the Arts
The Worlds Ahead Mural Project was an initiative of the Florida International University Art & Art History Department, the Miami Moving the Lives of Kids (MLK) Community Mural Project, Pi Kappa Alpha and Miami Children’s Hospital. About 50 people…

Philanthropist - Judah Touro 1775-1854
Though Judah Touro often wished to remain anonymous when he made his donations, it wasn’t an easily kept secret, and he soon became known throughout New Orleans for his generosity. He used his real estate business profits to build cemeteries,…

Morris Ketchum Jesup, Founder of Nonprofit Organizations
A black and white photograph of Morris Ketchum Jesup, a banker, philanthropist, and president of the American Museum of Natural History.

Whether creating his own foundations or giving away to ones already made, Morris Jesup spared no expense to…

Simon Guggenheim, Philanthropist
For every celebration and tragedy Simon Guggenheim and his family went through, he used his wealth to benefit the world as a result. When he was married to his wife Olga Hirsch, they provided a Thanksgiving dinner for 5,000 poor children in…

Mrs. Kate Wallert Barrett, Co-Founder National Crittention Mission
Kate Barett understood that in order to achieve her goals, she’d need to be taken seriously, which is why she pursued a medical degree in order to the title that would hold people’s attention. With it, she co-founded the National Florence Crittenton…

Zachary Fisher, Founder Fisher House Foundation
Zachary Fisher couldn’t join the army when he was younger due to a leg injury, but was determined to support them in any way he could throughout the rest of his life. He founded a campaign in 1978 to save the USS Intrepid (CV-11), a historic World…

Gregory Carr at VOA, Founder Gregory C. Carr Foundation
After retiring from his internet and phone businesses in 1998, Gregory Carr dedicated the rest of his life to philanthropy and charity. The year after, he got his start by creating the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University, which…

George Thorndike Angell, Founder of American Humane Education Society
In 1866, George Angell was attending a horse race when he saw two horses being run to death. In that moment, he resolved to use his skills as a lawyer and his funds to improvement treatment for animals so this tragedy wouldn’t happen again. He…
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